GlobalFoundries in Vermont received $30 million to expand the new generation of power electronics

GlobalFoundries in Vermont received $30 million to expand the new generation of power electronics

Senator Patrick Leahy, reported in an official press release, led this week a solemn ceremony dedicated to allocating $30 million of federal funds to expand the production of power electronic components in Vermont based on the Nitrid of Gallium, where GlobalFoundries is located and is able to process 600,000 silicon plates of 200 mm per year.

The grant will help GlobalFoundries to purchase the necessary equipment to expand the production of power electronics, both in the new generation network and in the electric vehicle industry, as well as in fixed energy facilities, including renewables. The GlobalFoundries Enterprise in Vermont, according to a certificate provided by the company, is one of the oldest in the United States, now employing about 2,000 employees.

The second significant aspect of the ceremony was the announcement of the interest of the U.S. Defense Agency in the development of the enterprise, because, through the relevant initiatives, the United States military has supported the development of gullium nitrate chips since 2019, and the ability of the components to cope with high pressures and to operate on high frequencies makes it possible to count on their dual use, both in civilian equipment and in the military.