The radio telescopes noticed a four to seven-fold increase in the speed of light -- the test showed a mistake, the laws of physics weren't broken

The radio telescopes noticed a four to seven-fold increase in the speed of light -- the test showed

Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope in August 2017 recorded a collision of two neutron stars, producing a powerful gravitational-wave surge of GW170817. The explosion released energy comparable to the energy from the supernova explosion. Now scientists have calculated that the explosion surge of matter has increased the speed of more than 99.97% of the speed of light, although the original measurements have been said to exceed the speed of light by four to seven times, which is not possible.

The impact of the collision of two neutron stars was observed by more than 70 observatoryes around the world and in space, and scientists quickly redirected the Hubble telescope's scientific tools to observe the site of the explosion.

Although this event took place in 2017, it took several years for scientists to develop a method of analysing Hubble data and other telescopes to form a complete picture of what had happened. Hubble's data were combined with observations of several National Science Foundation radio telescopes that were received 75 and 230 days after the explosion, as well as data from the Gaia satellite of the European Space Agency.

After analysing the observations, scientists concluded that one of the jet neutron stars that emerged from the collision was supposed to be moving at a rate seven times the speed of light. Radio telescopes showed that later the speed of the jet had fallen, but still remained at four times the speed of light. In reality, nothing could exceed the speed of light. Therefore, scientists repeated their calculations and determined that the jet was moving at a speed greater than 99.97% of the speed of light, which did not violate the laws of physics, but also looked very impressive.