Google started introducing a passwordless entry to Chrome and Android

Google started introducing a passwordless entry to Chrome and Android

Google announced that in the preliminary version of Google Play Services beta and in the last collection of the browser on the Chrome Canary test channel, there was support for access keys that would provide access to the company's services and, in the long run, to outside resources without the need to enter a password.

Previously, technogiants in Apple, Google and Microsoft, with the support of FIDO Alliance, have announced their intention to implement the option of a password-free entry on major platforms, replacing it with a mobile phone. By setting up a new way of entering the Google Play Services package and the desktop Chrome, the user first creates the access key on the phone by assuring it with a lock-in code or biometric, for subsequent access to the system on the phone, it will suffice to confirm its intention in the same way.

The locked key stored on the phone will then be used to enter a compatible service on another device, a laptop or desktope. For this and the service used on the computer, the browser must support this method of authentication. To make the entry, you need to scan the QR-code generated by the browser. The key is stored on the phone or on the client's computer and synchronised through the cloud storage to avoid complete blocking of the account when the phone is lost or the data on the PC are damaged.

Before the end of the year, Google promised to release API tools for external developers to implement the access key to other resources; technology support will be available in both Android applications and websites. The company is confident that the new authentication will be more user-friendly than traditional tools, and the password entry will eventually go back to the past.