Scientists found barium in the atmosphere of a hot Jupiter, the hardest element found in the atmosphere is the exoplanet found in the atmosphere

Scientists found barium in the atmosphere of a hot Jupiter, the hardest element found in the atmosph

Scientists from Europe and Chile first recorded the presence of barium vapours in the atmosphere of the exoplanet, found at the WASP-76b and WASP-121b sites.

Of all the exoplanets discovered to date, the so-called hot jockeys are the majority — gas giants located at extremely small distances from their stars — closer than the Sun is removed from Mercury. Because of this neighbourhood of the atmosphere, these planets heat up up to 1,000 - 1,300 K, or even 2,500 K, on the "solar" side, as in the case of WASP-76b and WASP-121b. At such high temperatures, such exoplanes are often shown by earth's incredible compounds: atmospheres of gaseous metals and rock rocks, clouds of lead and glass, as well as rains of diamonds, rubies, sapphires and other precious stones in the upper atmosphere.

The atmospheres of some hot jockeys have been established by scientists, often containing not only relatively light carbon and iron, but also much heavier elements — as it now turns out — including bariums whose atomic mass is 2.5 times the same iron — and the study notes that at 2,500 K on the "solar" side of these exoplanets, iron rains are constantly raining, and the atmosphere, in addition to barium, contains elements such as lithium, magnesium, chrome, vanadium, cobalt and stronthium — these elements have high melting and boiling temperatures, 1600 - 3300 K.

Scientists point out that they cannot yet explain the presence of barium vapours in the upper atmosphere of these planets; they can only assume that exoplanets are even more exotic than previously thought.