Be an amateur astronomer, tracking exoplanets like Jupiter for the SETI Institute

Be an amateur astronomer, tracking exoplanets like Jupiter for the SETI Institute

Your mission, if you agree to it, is to try to find an exoplanet candidate using the images obtained from the NASA Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite satellite. The project's origins are the SETI Institute, which aims to study, understand and explain the origin, nature and prevalence of life in the universe.

Confirmation of the presence or absence of an exoplanet

The SETI Institute and Unistellar Telescope Manufacturers launched a new campaign

To search for an exoplanet, TESS is monitoring the brightness of the stars. If one of the stars temporarily fades, it may be the result of passing an exoplanet. This very common method, known as "planet transit", has already allowed several thousand exoplanets to be rewritten.

However, other celestial bodies, including small stars, can prevent the detection of an exoplanet. These stars are also transitable and can reduce the brightness of other stars by eclipsed them. Thus, it is important to distinguish them, and that is what astronomy fans can help. Volunteers should study the objectives of TESS, which will provide data to determine the presence or absence of an exoplanet.

Important contribution of amateur astronomers

SETI Address

In addition, TESS could open another 10,000 exoplanets, which could again lead to campaigns involving amateur astronomers. In 2020, the satellite completed its main mission two years after launch.