James Webb captured a pair of "yearly rings"

James Webb captured a pair of "yearly rings"

NASA's James Webscope includes a pattern of 17 concentric dust rings emanating from a double-stellar Wolfe-Ray 140.

The Stars of Wolfe-Ray are called O-type stars that, when formed, have a mass 25 times greater than the Sun's, but now they are approaching the end of their life cycle so that they are more likely to collapse into a black hole in the future. These stars shine more than when they were young, and produce powerful winds, throwing a large amount of gas into space.

In our galaxy, they don't come together as often as 600 of them have been discovered so far. A couple star in the Wolf-Ray system 140 is the only one that forms a unique ring pattern to which it owes a form of orbit, not round, but long. As a result of the release of the substance to date, it is believed to have lost more than half of its mass.

Exploitable concentric rings occur as a result of a reaction that occurs when the stars approach once every eight years. Star winds, i.e., gas streams emitted by both stars, occur, and the matter is compressed and dust generated. The James Webb telescope was able to capture 17 such dust rings produced over a hundred years. Scientists were familiar with the system before, but had previously been able to record no more than a pair of rings.