Dementia can be detected nine years earlier: scientists found early signs

Dementia can be detected nine years earlier: scientists found early signs

Scientists at Cambridge University have identified signs to determine the development of dementia-related diseases, which can be used for screening and early diagnosis.

Researchers have analysed data from UK Biobank, a biomedical database containing anonymous genetic information, lifestyle and health information for half a million British between the ages of 40 and 69, and scientists have found that people who have developed dementia later in the years have experienced irregularities in solving problems and remembering numbers under certain conditions.

Scientists have found that people who have developed Alzheimer's have had lower results than healthy people a few years earlier when it comes to math problems, reaction speed exercises, and number memory problems, and the ability to remember what needs to be done.

Similar disorders have been observed in people who have developed a more rare form of dementia — frontal — and patients with Alzheimer's have observed that they have fallen more frequently in the past year than healthy people.

There are currently very few effective treatments for dementia or other neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, and the study believes that much of this is due to the late diagnosis of diseases when the collapse of the nervous system has gone too far. If early signs are used for screening and the risk of dementia is determined in advance, effective treatment can be developed, scientists are sure.