Space announces the launch of the first lunar mission from 9 to 15 November 2022

Space announces the launch of the first lunar mission from 9 to 15 November 2022

The Japanese company Ispace, which is involved in the construction of a series of lunar landing vehicles, announced that it was ready to launch the first one in November 2022, namely the launch window, which will last from 9 to 15 November.

The Japanese company Ispace, which is involved in the construction of a series of moon landing vehicles, announced a few months ago its readiness to launch the first one in November 2022, confirmed the launch window, which will last from 9 to 15 November. The first mission of the Japanese lander is known as M1 and will carry various experiments and payloads, both from the Japan Space Agency and from other companies.

Rasheed will also be on board.

The M1 mission will sail on SpaceX Falcon 9 from Cape Canaveral and will carry several commercial and government payloads, as well as bring the UAE moonship to the surface. The M1 spacecraft will reach the surface of the Moon in about three months, and the Japanese company will bypass competitors from Astrobotic and Intuitive Machines.

The latter, a member of NASA's CLPS program, planned to reach the moon surface by the end of this year, but could only do so in 2023, so the first commercial moon mission that will reach the surface of our satellite will be Japanese and begin at a very sensitive time, almost at the same time as the launch of Artemis 1.

After announcing the first launch window, the space company added that the control of the M1 landing vehicle would be from the HAKUTO-R Mission Control Centre, located in Tokyo. From the command centre, HAKUTO would be able to control the temperature, trajectory and dispatch teams to the landing vehicle, as well as to obtain images of the overflight around the Moon and the moon itself.

Finally, M1 will use the ESA Earth station for communications, a network of tracking stations located in Darmstadt, Germany, and the moon landing will be used by five ESTRACK antennas in French Guiana, Australia, Spain, Argentina and the United Kingdom.

The Japanese company is planning a second HAKUTO-R mission, called M2, which will be launched in 2024, again using the Falcon 9 rocket, which will be a research mission on the moon surface after the moon landing planned for the first mission, and since then Ispace has planned further missions up to M11.

Through this long series of launches, the Japanese company intends to explore the surface of our satellite, including the moon poles, in order to collect data for future missions. It will be important for both space and NASA to map the hidden regions of the Moon in search of ice and resources. All this will be done with a view to mission M11, which will aim at creating a stable industrial platform for the use of in-situ lunar resources.