The most detailed picture of Jupiter's satellite, which could have life on it, appeared

The most detailed picture of Jupiter's satellite, which could have life on it, appeared

The NASA Juno spacecraft drew closer to the moon of Jupiter Europe and photographed it in details that were not previously available to researchers.

The images show previously unexplored surface features that will help us understand what is happening in a lifeable ocean under Europe ' s thick ice crust. The images taken during a window for only a few minutes include the closest image of the moon from a height of 1,500 km above the surface of Europe.

The image, processed by Bjorn Jonsson, shows the surface with a resolution of about 1 km per pixel and shows many light and dark falls and previously unknown holes. The Crater Callanish, which NASA Galileo studied in the late 1990s and early 2000s, is shown in the lower right corner as a round dark spot.

The two images show the same part of Europe's surface, comparing different treatment approaches: one with minimal treatment, the other with a reinforced colour contrast that highlights the features of the surface.

Researchers note that they are interested in all four moons of Jupiter, but Europe is the most interested, and scientists believe that it is likely to have extraterrestrial life.

But Juno is unlikely to be able to determine whether anything lives in the deep ocean of Europe, but another NASA mission, Europe Clipper, which is expected to be launched in 2024, equipped with a set of nine state-of-the-art scientific instruments, will turn Europe into the most studied moon of the solar system.