Mha's protective mechanism was transplanted into human cells, and he corrected DNA errors

Mha's protective mechanism was transplanted into human cells, and he corrected DNA errors

Researchers at the Institute of Cellular and Molecular Botanists at the University of Bonn study how plants and animals struggle with mutations that accumulate in cells over the course of their lives, and to better understand these processes and learn how to cope with the consequences, they have moved the editor of PPR56, which operates in mocha mitochondriya, to human cells.

In order for all the processes in the cells to go smoothly, genetic information has to be correct. But over time, mutations in DNA accumulate errors, explain scientists. Ground-based plants have developed a way to correct these inaccuracies: they do not correct the errors in the genome directly, but carefully correct each individual transcript.

Scientists at the University of Bonn have moved this correction mechanism from mos Physcomitrium patens to human cells, and the study has shown that the correction mechanism has begun to operate in a new environment, and scientists have found that it adapts and corrects not only the goals that were targeted in plant cells, but over 900 different positions in human cell nuclear scripts.

In human cells, there are far more transcriptions of nuclear RNA than mitochondrial transcriptions in moss, and as a result, editors have far more targets to attack.

Scientists point out that the transcriptor operates according to a specific code, but it is not yet clear which objectives it chooses to correct. In future studies, scientists plan to study and learn how to manage this mechanism to treat the diseases associated with mutations in cells.