The holographic microscope creates detailed images of the brain through the skull

The holographic microscope creates detailed images of the brain through the skull

Researchers from the Catholic University of Korea and Seoul National University have developed a new type of holographic microscope that helps to visualize brain structures without surgery.

Light is scattered many times in complex structures, such as living tissue. This causes photons to change their direction several times in a random way while passing through tissue. As a result, in classical scans, most of the electromagnetic waves are distorted and the image is washed away.

For their work, scientists have quantified how light and matter interact and, in particular, researchers have developed a method of choosing once-dispersed waves, using the fact that they have similar forms of reflection even when light is released at different angles.

Using a complex algorithm and numerical operation that analyzes distortions and interference between different waves of light, researchers have developed a microscope that focuses more than 80 times more light energy on nerve fibers than before, using a sounding beam in the visible range of wave lengths and can selectively process and extinguish side signals.

In a series of experiments, scientists took several images of the mice' brain, and the test results showed that despite the large amount of interference and dispersion, the device creates contrasting images with 412 nm resolution.