Engineers have created a bionic predator plant: it's got enough living organisms

Engineers have created a bionic predator plant: it's got enough living organisms

Researchers have developed a slippery surface that reacts to moisture, and scientists have used prototypes of frog language and predatory flower to demonstrate. A water-sensitive slippery surface that changes shape is needed to develop bionic robots.

Plants can catch and digest small insects with sophisticated mechanisms, explained by unique surface wetting, which inspired the development of many devices, such as icy surfaces, biograzing and condensation and drip manipulating devices.

In the new work, scientists have combined two strategies of predatory plants: active and passive; the first provides a response to incentives; and the second provides a slippery surface that captures prey.

Scientists used direct photo-rehabilitation using a femtosecond laser and at the same time structure to create a two-layered GO and LRGO drive that provides dynamic water-induced deformation, and the slippery surface soaked in lubricant was then integrated with the graphene drive by means of a special lubricant and capillary force.

Research on prototypes has shown that a sensitive surface can interact with water drops and living organisms in two ways, allowing them to move passively or actively by means of a drive. Developers believe that new technology can be used to collect and determine rainfall, bionic robotics and intelligent tissues.