Opening a new type of horny dinosaur

Opening a new type of horny dinosaur

A group of paleontologists from the University of Harrisburg recently named and described a species of horny dinosaur found in the United States several decades ago.

The sample was first discovered in the San Juan basin in New Mexico in 1975 and its skull was almost intact, and it took several decades of clean-up and analysis to finally confirm that this dinosaur is a new species for our science, now known as Bisiceraps froeseorum, under the leadership of Dr. Stephen Yasinsky of the Harrisburg University of Natural Sciences.

Researchers believe that this dinosaur lived about 74 million years ago in the chalk period. Bisiceratops froeseorum belonged to a large family of ceratops, which includes the famous triceratops. However, the triceratops appeared only eight million years later, at the very end of this period.

These large herbal dinosaurs are best known for their long horns and collars, both as a safeguard against attack and as a sign of sex used to demonstrate and choose a couple.

Traces of a predator

We know that these animals, living in herds, were also targeted by large predators. The traces of these interactions can be found on this sample. Paleontologists have identified several bites on various parts of the skull, including the upper jaws, cheek, and crest. Based on their location and size, these wounds are likely to have been caused by a tyrannosaurus. However, it is not known whether the predator stalked and killed the bisticeratops or simply stumbled upon their carcass.

According to researchers, the length of the bisticeratops ranged from 4.8 to 6 metres and the weight ranged from 2.5 to 4 tons.

The finding of this dinosaur expands the understanding of scientists of the paleobio-diverseness of the American South-West, giving a clearer picture of what life was like in this region by the end of the dinosaurs. ', notes Dr. Stephen Yasinsky.'