An algorithm has been developed that predicts whether an astronaut will survive on the way to Mars

An algorithm has been developed that predicts whether an astronaut will survive on the way to Mars

Space medicine experts at the Australian National University have modelled the impact of space travel on the human cardiovascular system, and the computer system is assessing whether the body will be able to withstand extreme conditions.

The conditions of weightlessness and microgravity have a significant impact on the work of the human body. Researchers say that prolonged exposure to weightlessness can make the heart lazy because it does not have to work so hard to overcome gravity to pump blood into the body.

On Earth, gravity draws fluid to the lower half of our body, explains scientists, and is related, for example, to the fact that some people's feet are starting to swell by the end of the day. During space travel, this gravitational pull disappears, and the fluid flows into the upper half of the body, and that makes the brain think that there's too much fluid in the body.

As a result, you start to go to the toilets often, get rid of excess fluids, feel no thirst, and drink less, which leads to dehydration in space, which is why you can see on the news how astronauts faint when they go back to Earth.

The model uses an algorithm based on data from astronauts collected from past space missions, and based on individual medical data, the system can predict what risks it might face when travelling to Mars.

The model is based on well-trained astronauts. In future work, researchers want to expand the algorithm by teaching it to predict what will happen to a "normal" person during space travel.