Astrophysicists first saw a photon ring near the horizon of black hole events

Astrophysicists first saw a photon ring near the horizon of black hole events

After the publication of the first image of the supermassive black hole in the center of the M87 galaxy in 2019, researchers suggested that there should be a photon ring behind the fire orange blinks; its existence was predicted by Einstein's theory; astrophysics were able to create an even more detailed image of the black hole on which the predicted structure can be seen.

The black holes were long thought to be invisible, but in 2019, scientists first published a black hole in the center of the M87 galaxy, a superhygant elliptical galaxy located 53.5 million light-years from the Earth, which was made possible by a global network of EHT telescopes.

In the new work, astrophysicists used additional software and visualization algorithms to restore the image based on data obtained in 2017 and used for the first image of a black hole. The new image shows a photon ring consisting of a series of increasingly bright sub-rings that form an entire picture.

According to Einstein's theory, black holes surround photon light rings, which are concentric circles of photons cast by a powerful gravity black hole, although their existence has been predicted for quite some time, no one has been able to observe them until now.

In addition to the first picture of the supermassive black hole, it provided the first picture of the relatively small but extremely active black hole, the Arrow A*, located in the centre of the Milky Way.