The Martian InSight probe found no ice clusters under the surface of the Red Planet

The Martian InSight probe found no ice clusters under the surface of the Red Planet

Researchers have published new data on the Red Planet from the already-stopping InSight probe. Scientists have not been able to find the expected amount of ice near the surface of the planet, writing Geophysical Research. According to InSight, the ice was not detected up to a depth of 300 metres.

InSight, which tracked marsights and other vibrations, obtaining more detailed information on the composition of the rock.

One of the hypotheses about Mars is that billions of years ago, the vast surface of Mars was covered by oceans, and experts believed that much of the water was now hidden beneath the planet's surface in the form of glaciers.

Experts were looking for fossil deposits similar to clay. They are formed with large quantities of water and have specific seismic properties. In fact, water is becoming part of the mineral structure. According to one of the authors of the study, Michael Mang, they have not been able to find the expected quantities of such "water minerals." To test the data, experts have done computer simulations several thousand times.

," specified Manga.

Geophysicist San Diego Vashan Wright of the University of California supported the theory that the evidence did not rule out the availability of water in the form of ice grains, but questioned the possibility.