The meteor exploded over the U.S., and the experts found out where it came from

The meteor exploded over the U.S., and the experts found out where it came from

Deseret News reports that there was a noise in Utah at 8:32 a.m. local time, and the Seismographers ruled out the earthquake, and the National Meteorological Service Salt Lake City later published a radar image of two red flares, but there were no thunderstorms or lightnings at the location where they were recorded.

Later, security footage from private houses in Roy, Utah, recorded a blue fire ball in the sky, which is flying through the morning sky just before the explosion, and numerous accounts of it were sent to the American Meteor Society.

There were no reports of meteoroids detected as a result of a meteor explosion, although a NASA volunteer informed KSL-TV that the explosion could have scattered fragments of space stone throughout the region, all of which made it difficult to determine where it came from, but experts from Deseret News stated that the stone had come from the perseid meteor flux.

When the Earth passes through the debris left by the 109P/Swift-Tuttle comet, you can see the perseid meteor flux in the sky every year, in July and August. According to the American Meteor Society, most of this "space debris" is very small, but it faces the planet's atmosphere at 2,14360 km/h. This year the peak of Perceid peaked on 11 and 12 August.