Look at the new picture of Hubble: it's gonna help solve the early history of Milky Way

Look at the new picture of Hubble: it's gonna help solve the early history of Milky Way

The NGC 6540 is located in the constellation of the Shooter. Astronomers have made an image using the NASA/ESA 3 wide-angle camera and an improved view camera.

The tools differ from one vision to another: it affects how much of the sky is captured by each of them. The new composite image shows the star-wrenched region of the sky that both instruments have captured.

The NGC 6540 is a stable ball cluster that is closely connected with many stars. The population of these clusters varies from tens of thousands to millions of stars, all of which are confined to a dense group because of the inter-gravitatal gravity.

The brightest stars in the image are decorated with visible crusades of light known as diffractional flares. These artifacts of the image are caused by the structure of the Hubble, not by the stars themselves. The path of the star's light, when it hits the telescope, is slightly disrupted by its internal structure, with the result that bright objects are surrounded by flashes of light.

The Hubble has studied the heart of NGC 6540 so that astronomers measure the age, shape and structure of the ball assemblies in the center of the Milky Way. The gas and dust that cover the center of the galaxy block part of the light from the clusters, as well as slightly alter the colors of their stars.