Intel has abandoned API DirectX 9 hardware in its video cards, which will be implemented through the DirectX 12 emulator

Intel has abandoned API DirectX 9 hardware in its video cards, which will be implemented through the

Intel abandoned the graphic API DirectX 9 hardware support with integrated solutions on Xe architecture in the 12th generation of Core processors, as well as discrete Arc A-series video maps on Arc Alchemist architecture. Instead, DirectX 9 support will be emulsed with API DirectX 12.

The emulation will use the conversion layer, the Microsoft D3D9On12 library with open source code. In this case, the DirectX 9 graphic commands will be sent to D3D9On12 instead of directly being sent to the Intel graphic driver. The D3D9On12 converter layer will translate the D3D9 graphics commands into queries that are understandable to the API D3D12 algorithms. If it is easier, instead of the real Intel graphic driver, the D3D9On12 driver will perform the D3D12 function itself.

According to Microsoft, the level of emulation productivity was close to that of the actual implementation of API DirectX 9 and, in some cases, not at all.

For Intel, the solution can be useful. Now the company will be able to focus more on optimizing its drivers to a more recent API DirectX 11 because there are problems now. All the challenges associated with optimizing DirectX 9 will in turn be "set up" on Microsoft. It is not yet known whether the Intel example of NVIDIA and AMD will follow. However, the rejection of the old API hardware support has its own negatives, for example, in the form of higher CPU loads and side effects in games with DirectX 9.