This beautiful galaxy, taken by the Hubble telescope, cannot be classified

This beautiful galaxy, taken by the Hubble telescope, cannot be classified

A picture taken last week from the Hubble Space Telescope shows at least three galaxies: the NGC 4680 galaxy in the centre of the picture and the two smaller galaxies in the bottom of the picture and on the extreme right corner.

The galaxy in the center, NGC 4680, is best known for having a supernova identified in 1997, called SN 1997bp. This supernova was seen by an amateur astronomer from Australia named Robert Evans, who holds a record for the number of supernovas discovered visually, which is incredible 42 events.

The NGC 4680 galaxy has other interesting features, starting with its classification. Generally speaking, there are three main types of galaxies: spiral, elliptical and incorrect. Our galaxy, the Milky Way, is a spiral galaxy, with the bulging of matter in the center and the sleeves extending along the spiral.

But not all galaxies fall into these categories, so there are other differences. For example, the lens galaxies are halfway between spiral and elliptical galaxies. But the object of this picture of Hubble, NGC 2680, has been classified as spiral and lens galaxy. That's because, as you can see in the picture, it has spiral sleeves.

Hubble scientists point out that galaxies also change over time, so their classification can change. "," they write. "