Eight years ago, the first interstellar meteorite landed on Earth: scientists came up with a way to find it

Eight years ago, the first interstellar meteorite landed on Earth: scientists came up with a way to

Amir Siraj and Harvard Avi Leb of Harvard University, the first to declare the interstellar nature of the CNEOS meteor of 8 January 2014, developed a plan to search for its fragments, for which they merged with an ocean technology consulting company.

Most of the meteorite would burn during its descent into the Earth's atmosphere, probably leaving only fragments scattered at the bottom of the ocean; however, satellite data, combined with wind and ocean current data, would reduce the search area to 10×10 km.

Scientists suggest that the fragments will be magnetized. If the ship is equipped with a large magnet, it can potentially collect tiny pieces of meteorite from the bottom of the ocean. Siraj and Leb have developed a search plan and merged with an ocean technology consulting company.

In 2014, a meteorite about a half-metre long fell into the ocean near the coast of Papua New Guinea, indicating that it was an interstellar space rock. If the information is confirmed, it's only the third known object of its kind, after Oumumamua and Borisov's comet, and the first one that made it to Earth.