World chip sales have been slowing down for six months, with fears of recession rising

World chip sales have been slowing down for six months, with fears of recession rising

The positive trend in global sales in the semiconductor market has been slowing down for six consecutive months, which is seen as another sign of a slowdown in the world economy against the backdrop of rising interest rates and negative geopolitical factors.

Semiconductor sales grew by 13.3% in June 2022 compared to June last year, and May's annual growth was 18%, according to the Semi-Industry Association. This is the longest-growing decline since the US and PRC trade wars began in 2018. The three-month rolling average half-conductor sales correlates with the global economy in recent decades, and the last reason for optimism was the decision of the largest producers of Samsung Electronics to consider reducing investment plans.

Semiconductor market growth has been slowed by factors common to all sectors of the economy: the rise of key central bank rates to combat inflation, the Ukrainian events and the Chinese pandemic elbows, all of which have a depressing effect on international trade. For example, South Korea, the world ' s largest producer of memory components, showed a 2.1 per cent increase in chip exports in July and 10.7 per cent in June. Overall, growth has slowed for the fourth consecutive month, and in June, semi-conductor reserves have shown a record increase over the past six years; Taiwan is another major player in the world ' s semi-conductor industry. In June and July, both production and demand fell, with export orders showing the largest decline.

The negative dynamics of the major production sites are inextricably linked to the largest markets: China continues to have elbows; the U.S. GDP falls two quarters in a row, although the National Bureau of Economic Research has consistently not called it a recession; and Europe has been reducing production, clouding prospects both in its region and throughout the world, while the International Monetary Fund argues that the global economy is still showing positive momentum, and the slowdown in the semi-conductor sector is not sufficient evidence of an inevitable recession, although it points to economic problems, which are largely dependent on semi-conductor components in most areas.