Thousands of jellyfish "captured" the banks of Israel, reaching hundreds of metres deep

Thousands of jellyfish "captured" the banks of Israel, reaching hundreds of metres deep

In the Mediterranean Sea, near the port city of Haifa in northern Israel, Medusa has been crawling in huge quantities, and according to The Jerusalem Post, the sea is "sprayed by thousands of white dots." The accumulation extends to a depth of several hundred metres.

Representatives of Israel's Nature and Parks Authority in the Gulf of Haifa posted video footage on the website and advised people not to bathe in the area because of the risk of painful bites.

An unusually high concentration of jellyfish is likely to be associated with human activity, including pollution and climate change, as described in the statement by the representatives of the NPA.

The dramatic increase in the number of jellyfish this summer could have catastrophic consequences for the marine ecosystem near the coastal Haifa and even affect industry and tourism, as stated in the statement by Ruthie Yahel, the marine environmentalist NPA.

The jellyfish, the most common species of jellyfish in waters near Haifa, are invasive species living in the tropical waters of the Indian and Pacific Ocean, and scientists suspect that they have invaded the Mediterranean Sea from the Indian Ocean using the Suez Canal, an artificial waterway in Egypt connecting the Mediterranean Sea with the Red Sea through the Suez Passion.