Microsoft has stated that Action Blizzard does not release unique games, but is willing to pay $68.7 billion for it

Microsoft has stated that Action Blizzard does not release unique games, but is willing to pay $68.7

Microsoft has used a curious approach to obtain regulatory approval to purchase Activion Blizzard for $68.7 billion. According to the source, recently the American platform owner informed the New Zealand Trade Commission that buying the Action Blizzard would not have a negative impact on the market because the publisher does not issue .

," says Microsoft.

In other words, Microsoft believes that ownership of the most popular franchises is not going to affect competition with companies like Sony; at first glance, this seems to be a pointless argument for a company that Microsoft is planning to spend $68.7 billion on, but thus the software giant is somehow responding to competitors.

Recently, Sony called Call of Duty AAA-game in an address to the Brazilian industry regulator, a Japanese platform holder believed that the franchise was so popular that it affected what game consoles consumers buy. In 2015, Sony entered into an agreement with Action Blizzard, in which some of Call of Duty's content first appeared on PlayStation.

Depreciation of Call of Duty is only one of the ways Microsoft uses to persuade regulators to give their way to the Activation Blizzard acquisition deal. In February this year, Microsoft promised to continue to release the Call of Duty games on PlayStation consoles and after all previous agreements.