Astronomers found out how much dust was in the nebula, where the solar system was born

Astronomers found out how much dust was in the nebula, where the solar system was born

A group of researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Chemistry and the University of Paris-Sacle found evidence that supernova stars and their original parents could have contributed more dust to the solar nebula than previously thought.

The prestellar grains appear in the stars and are thrown into space after it is supernovad. Then they are exposed to temperature, pressure, and star dust, most often in the form of silicates. Those older than the solar system are known as presolar grains. They can be found in negligible amounts of dust between planets, comets, and meteorites.

Since then, scientists have believed that such supernova grains represent only a small percentage of what can be seen today — only 10 per cent — and in the new work researchers have found evidence that they are three times as large.

Scientists have come to the conclusion that the sun's nebula was dusted from the saline grains and, according to the cosmogonal theory, the solar system was formed from the nebula.

Previously, scientists from the U.S. Field Museum of Natural History discovered the oldest solid material on Earth: star dust, which is at least several hundred million years older than the solar system; dust particles were trapped in a meteorite that fell in Australia 50 years ago; these particles are an example of presolar grains; they are estimated to be between five and seven billion years old; for comparison, the Sun is about 4.6 billion years old.