Engineers are developing a new prosthetic arm that works in breath

Engineers are developing a new prosthetic arm that works in breath

The new device is designed primarily for those who are too young or anatomically inappropriate for an uncomfortable suspension and cable system, the results of which are published in the journal Prosthesis. The designers argue that this light device is an alternative to traditional prostheses. It is estimated that body-operated prosthetics usually use the Bowden cable.

"Our device provides a new version of prosthetics that can be used without limiting any movement of the user's body. This is one of the first truly new approaches to the design and management of the prosthesis with a body drive since the introduction of the cable drive system more than two centuries ago," says the Senior Author, Professor Jerun Bergmann, Faculty of Engineering at Oxford University.

Users activate a small Tesla turbine that can accurately control the movement of prosthetic fingers by regulating their breathing. Even small children can provide the required amount of air, and the tooth transmission in the device determines the rate of grabbing.

The device does not require cables or seatbelts, which makes it easy for children and adolescents to wear. Minimum maintenance and training is required compared to other prosthetics.