Ape smallpox virus: What is it?

Ape smallpox virus: What is it?

A monkey's smallpox virus is a shell DNA virus belonging to the Poxviridae family and Orthopoxvirus. Its genetic material consists of one linear two-chain DNA molecule of about 170-250 kbp. It has a "kirpic" shape typical of the Poxviridae.

How is ape smallpox virus infected?

The monkey virus enters the host cell after the interaction of viral proteins on the membrane and glycosamine glycans on the surface of the cell — the exact receptor is not known to date. The mechanism for infiltration of the virus is also the subject of discussion. It is reproduced only in cytoplasm, near the nucleus, in virus manufactures, where the early genes involved in replicating the DNA of the virus are first replicated and later genes participating in the virio structure. All components of the monkey smallpox virus are collected outside viral factories and mature virios are released when the cell dies.

Ape smallpox virus stamms are classified into two different treasures: the West African treasure and the Congo basin treasure; it was first detected in 1958 in Danish laboratory monkeys, hence the name, and in humans.