China's Changjeng-5B missiles were found in Indonesia and Malaysia

China's Changjeng-5B missiles were found in Indonesia and Malaysia

Some fragments of the large Chinese Long March 5B rocket, which launched the Wenyan laboratory module for the Chinese orbital station under construction, landed on the Earth's surface in South-East Asia, where they were discovered by local residents.

The main stage of the Long March 5B rocket, with a mass of more than 20 tons, began an uncontrolled fall to Earth over the past weekend over the Indian Ocean. A large part of the accelerator burned in the atmosphere during the fall, but 20 to 40 percent of its mass "survived" a hard journey and reached the surface of the planet.

Fortunately, no one has been injured, but the people of Indonesia and Malaysia have reported at least a few findings, some of which are so large that they could potentially harm residents or structures, but there is not yet any real evidence that it is the wreckage of a Chinese missile, but a well-known expert, Jonathan McDawell, from the Harvard-Smixon Astrophysics Center, has reported the findings, so at least his information should be taken into account.

Uncontrollable de-orbiting has been used in Chinese missile launches and earlier. It is known that since the first Long March 5B launch in May 2020, the debris has landed in Côte d'Ivoire, after the second in April 2021, the wreckage has landed in the Indian Ocean. Another missile of this type will go to Tiangun station this fall, probably in October. According to the representative of the California company LeoLabs, it is highly desirable that in the course of the mission, there will still be a small amount of fuel left in the tanks for controlled re-entry.