Crab violinist inspired scientists to create an advanced system of artificial vision

Crab violinist inspired scientists to create an advanced system of artificial vision

Current systems of artificial vision have some limitations: they are not suitable for visualization of both terrestrial and underwater environments and are limited to the semi-spherical field of vision.

To address these problems, a group of researchers from Korea and the United States, including Professor Young Min Sung of the Kwangju Institute of Science and Technology in Korea, developed a new system of artificial vision, which is equipped with an all-directed image that can work in both the aquatic and terrestrial environments.

The system was inspired by a crab violinist, a type of semi-earth crab with a 360° field of view, which is possible because of the elliboidal stem of the complex eyes of the crab, which provides panoramic images of amphibians.

Consequently, researchers have developed a vision system that consists of a set of flat microlins with a calibrated refractation profile; they have been integrated into a flexible combing matrix of silicon photodiodes and then embedded in a spherical structure; the Gradient Refrigeration and the flat surface of the microlins have been optimized to compensate for the reflection effects due to changes in the external environment. Simply put, the light beams that pass in different environments are concentrated in the same location.