Astronomers "watched" the growth of the dwarf galaxy

Astronomers "watched" the growth of the dwarf galaxy

In a new study, astronomers focused the AstroSat Space Telescope on several blue compact dwarf galaxies, estimated to be between 1.5 and 3.9 billion light years away from the Earth, and scientists then used an ultraviolet telescope aboard AstroSat, India's first multiwave space telescope to search for evidence of star formation activity.

Previous attempts to observe star formation in dwarf galaxies have been hampered by their low luminous intensity, small size and small mass of objects contained therein, and scientists have overcome these problems through AstroSat due to the high resolution of its telescope and the ability to capture several waves of light simultaneously, and it is also equipped with deep field imagery technology in the UV range.

In analysing AstroSat data for 17 hours, researchers found evidence of material movement from the outer edges of 11 dwarf galaxies into the center, which would result in material accumulation in the inner parts of the galaxy, which could lead to the creation of stars and other bodies, such as planets and moons, which are likely to be drawn inwards by torque from gas and star complexes.

Previous studies have shown that there are dwarf galaxies in the universe, usually composed of just a few billion stars. Scientists have long assumed that some of them may evolve to become more mature galaxies, but as it happens, it is not clear.