There are inexplicable holes on the bottom of the Atlantic: no one knows who left them

There are inexplicable holes on the bottom of the Atlantic: no one knows who left them

Scientists studying the flooded mountain Ridge in the middle of the Atlantic have come across an unexplained phenomenon: a series of holes, as if they were punctured at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean; the photographs that scientists have taken show that the dots are connecting in almost straight lines or trails. NOAA Ocean Exploration is not yet sure how to explain it.

"We've seen several of these sublinary holes in the precipitation. These holes were previously reported from the region, but their origins remain a mystery," reported NOAA Ocean Exploration. "Even though they look almost made by a man, small piles of sediment around the holes give the impression that they were dug up... by someone."

Openings were discovered on 23 July at a depth of 2.7 km when they dived to the top of an underwater volcano north of the Azores. A remote-controlled camera was used for safe recording.

NOAA published online photographs showing that the holes were found on a flat sandy surface, and scientists invited the public to express their theories about the origin of the holes.

The discovery was made as part of the expedition "Travel to the Ridge 2022", which explores and maps the little-explored deep-sea areas of the Charlie-Gibbs fracture zone, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the Azoro Plateau.

The Mid-Atlantic Ridge extends from the north to the south and is considered to be the longest mountain ridge in the world and one of the most outstanding geological sites on Earth.