Astrophysics found an ultra-brilliant source of X-ray radiation in a nearby galaxy

Astrophysics found an ultra-brilliant source of X-ray radiation in a nearby galaxy

An international group of astrophysicists investigated the galaxy of NGC 55 with the help of an XMM-Newton telescope, which found that a previously recorded source of X-ray radiation was above 1.6 dudcellion erg/s. This is the second ultra-light X-ray source in this galaxy.

The new source of radiation is transzyent, it is not permanent, but unlike most such sources with a rigid spectrum, the NGC 55 ULX-2 has a soft spectrum of radiation, noted by the authors of the study, which was first detected in 2010, but at that time light intensity was just over 1,038 erg/s, which prevented it from being classified as ultra-light.

In the new work, researchers have shown that NGC 55 ULX-2 is about a month old, and researchers believe that this could be associated with accretion rate or accretion of accretion disc.

Ultra-routine X-ray sources are astronomical objects with extremely high radiation in the X-ray range, exceeding the radiation from a million suns at all wave lengths. ULX is less bright than active galactic nuclei, but more stable than any known star process.

Although numerous studies of ULX have been carried out and many hypotheses have been advanced, the nature of the sources of such powerful radiation has not been conclusively established; the discovery of new objects can solve this problem.

The NGC 55 galaxy is one of the nearest local galaxy, including the Milky Way. It is located about 6.5 million light years away from the Earth.