During the Titanic diving, engineers were testing a new video link technology

During the Titanic diving, engineers were testing a new video link technology

Researchers from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology have developed a method to improve videoconferencing, which can now be conducted even with very low capacity connections, passing data even under extreme conditions, and the system has already been tested during the sinking to the Titanic crash site. It is located at a depth of almost 4,000 metres in the North Atlantic.

"The transmission of data from a depth of four kilometres through salt water without any loss is extremely complex," says Professor Alex Weibel, a co-author of a study conducted by KIT staff.

During the experiment, researchers developed synthetic methods for converting video data into text; the sound recording is first converted into an underwater machine and then transmitted to the surface by the sound pulses of the hydrolocator, where the video is restored from the text.

Then a synthetic voice appears in the video that compares to a human voice. The synthes of the video is controlled in such a way that the lips of the speaker move in synchronously with the sound. In the future, it will facilitate remote communication.

The technology tested by engineers when dived to the Titanic crash site is based on decades of pioneering work in the translation of the speech; earlier, Alex Weibel, a co-author of the study, created a lecture translator, which is used at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology to automatically record the professor's speech in lectures and simultaneously translate speech signals into written English.