Children began to have weird hepatitis: these could be two viruses working together

Children began to have weird hepatitis: these could be two viruses working together

According to the authors, it could be a coinfection of two common viruses; it's a infection of one cell in different types of viruses.

The World Health Organization reported at least 1,010 cases of such infection, 46 of which required a transplant and 22 of which were fatal.

Now scientists discovered another virus — AAV2 or adeno-associated virus 2 — that played an important role in the infection and was present in 96 percent of all patients surveyed.

Normally, AAV2 does not cause disease and cannot self-produce without the presence of another auxiliary virus.

The authors concluded that there had been a co-infection using AAV2, either adenovirus or HHV6 herpes virus.

Nevertheless, more work is needed to understand why some children are developing a severe disease and requiring transplantation.