Uber admitted the attempt to cover up the data leak in 2016 and avoided prosecution

Uber admitted the attempt to cover up the data leak in 2016 and avoided prosecution

Uber Technologies claimed responsibility for covering up the leak of data that occurred in 2016 as a result of a hacking attack, when 57 million drivers and passengers were reported by the perpetrators, and the company pleaded guilty to the prosecution deal, thereby avoiding prosecution.

Mr. Stephanie Heinds has an agreement to launch a 20-year comprehensive confidentiality programme.

The company also filed charges in the case of its former head of security, Joseph Sullivan, who allegedly played a role in concealing information about the hacker attack. The prosecution of Mr. Sullivan was filed in September 2020, and the top manager allegedly agreed to pay $100,000 in bitcoin to hackers and even received from them a signed non-disclosure agreement that contained a false allegation that they did not steal data.

In September 2018, Uber, for $148 million, settled the claims of all 50 U.S. states and the Capital District of Columbia, disgruntled by late disclosures of hacker attacks and leaks.