Astronomers found the largest neutron star, 2.5 times heavier than the Sun

Astronomers found the largest neutron star, 2.5 times heavier than the Sun

Researchers have identified PSR object J0952-0607 as the hardest neutron star in the history of observation.

The previous record was a neutron star in the northern constellation of Giraffe, called PSR J0740+6620, which was 2.08 times as massive as the Sun. But if a neutron star becomes too massive, it collapses under its weight and turns into a black hole, so scientists want to understand the peak mass of a neutron star.

PSR J0952-0607 is located in the constellation Secstant. It is 2,000 light years away from Earth, far above the plane of the galaxy in the Milky Way. At each rotation, the neutron star emits a radio wave, so astronomers also classify this object as a pulsar. For the first time in 2017, the pulsar was reported to rotate every 1.41 milliseconds, which is faster than all other pulsars.

And that's why scientists decided to study the object -- the rapid rotation made them suspect that the pulsar could be extremely heavy -- because there was another star in the pulsar orbit that could spin it and increase the mass of the object.

Using the star's speed and orbital period of about six and a half hours, the team calculated the mass of the pulsar, which is twice the mass of the Sun, much heavier than a typical neutron star, which is only 1.4 times larger than the Sun.