Israel will create a quantum computer on Dutch processors, British memory and American architecture

Israel will create a quantum computer on Dutch processors, British memory and American architecture

The National Quantum Initiative of Israel, which will establish a quantum development centre and a first quantum computer in the country, will make a decisive contribution to the creation of a quantum numerator in Israel by companies from abroad, although the project will be coordinated and developed by the Tel Aviv start-up company Quantum Machines.

The Quantum Computation Center with a 50-cube system is expected to be operational in a year-and-a-half; the most important feature of Israel's quantum computer will be that it will be a flexible and modernized system that will not rely on one technology; the system will gradually realize the most advanced finds in the area of quantum computing, and the number of cubes will constantly increase to hundreds and thousands.

The Quantum Machines, the leader of the INQI project, does not develop quantum processors on its own. The company specializes in developing the hardware and software infrastructure needed to operate quantum systems. This again emphasizes that the Israeli quantum system will be flexible and live; it will change and test the best solutions.

An Israeli quantum consortium included a local electronics defense manufacturer, Elbit Systems, a Dutch quantum processor, QuantWare, ColdQuanta, and a British company, ORCA Computing, which created a photon quantum memory technology.

"The co-founder and CEO of Quantum Machines, Itamar Siwan, said, "and in order for the project to be implemented, Israel's Innovation Authority will allocate the equivalent of $58 million to work.