The photos from the Webb telescope were shown in a different light to see the twins of the Milky Way

The photos from the Webb telescope were shown in a different light to see the twins of the Milky Way

A beautiful photograph of the NGC 628 spiral galaxy, based on Webb data, can give an idea of how dust behaves in space.

The image is a compilation of three sets of data at different wave lengths received by JWST, which is responsible for medium infrared instruments. Gabriel Brammer of Copenhagen University in Denmark, not affiliated with NASA, downloaded data and converted each of the infrared wave lengths into red, green and blue, before merging them into one image.

The NGC 628 galaxy was previously photographed in visible light and other telescopes, including Hubble. Externally, it is very similar to the Milky Way, as a twin, when viewed from above on a galaxy plane. JWST's ability to observe infrared light in a high resolution reveals its hidden structure. "If eyes could see an object in medium infrared waves, the night sky was similar to this picture and a bit scary," Brammer says.

The characteristic purple shade of Brammer's image is due to the unique chemical composition of dust clouds NGC 628. They are mainly made up of large molecules known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

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