The stem cells can now be reprogrammed to restore sensitivity

The stem cells can now be reprogrammed to restore sensitivity

Staff from the Centre for Regenerative Medicine and stem cell research, Ali and Edith Brod, at the University of California in Los Angeles, developed the first-ever stem cell road map.

In a study conducted using embryo stem cells from mice, scientists have also developed a method to obtain all types of sensory internierones in the laboratory. As the authors of the new article noted, if their work can be replicated using human stem cells, this will be a key step in developing therapy to restore sensitivity to victims due to spinal trauma.

Sensory internierones in the spinal cord are responsible for transmitting sensory information from the whole body to the central nervous system. In 2018, Samantha Butler's senior research lab, a professor of neurobiology, became the first group to create sensory internierones from human embryos and induced pluripotent stem cells.

Now scientists have submitted detailed protocols that can be used to channel stem cells into each of the six sub-types of sensory internirones, and internerones created using these protocols are genetically and molecularly indistinguishable from their real analogs in the body, so scientists think that cells will have the same sensory functions.