Scientists have come up with a way to get silicon solar panels to generate more energy

Scientists have come up with a way to get silicon solar panels to generate more energy

One of the most important elements of the new energy is the solar panels, but their efficiency still leaves much to be desired. Popular silicon panels only work in red and infrared spectrums of sunlight, while the rest of the spectrum is dispersed without benefit. American scientists have tried to find a way to capture the blue spectrum and convert it into red so that the silicon gets more photons and energy.

Researchers at the Tandon Engineering School of New York University have developed a thin film that has improved solar battery efficiency by converting non-silicon-reacting waves of light into those that can be used to generate electricity, and for this purpose scientists have conducted many experiments with various solar panels, materials and dyes that would have helped to use most of the spectrum, but so far there have been no special successes until they have created a thin film of perovsky with the addition of itterbium.

The silicon photon film successfully absorbed photons in the blue and ultraviolet spectrum, and itterbium emitted that energy in the near infrared range, transferring the silicon substrate of photons as it had absorbed well. The effectiveness of the proposed film was 82.5 per cent and could even exceed 100 per cent if the right component ratio was selected. This is not the Silicon Silicon Silicon Silicon Silicon Silicon Silicon, but the efficiency with which the blue photons become "red".

This kind of transformation will make it possible to raise the silicon panels a little bit more, but so far scientists are not even going to say the approximate numbers, which requires new research.