The clouds of the Fermi bubbles of our galaxy turned out to be alien

The clouds of the Fermi bubbles of our galaxy turned out to be alien

Scientists have found that the metal content in the high-speed clouds of Fermi bubbles is not consistent with the galaxy centre of the Milky Way. Based on these data, astrophysicists have assumed that at least part of the material enters the clouds from somewhere else.

In the article, scientists noted that there are not many studies of the composition of HVCS FB. However, many suggest that clouds consist of material that was emitted from star discs near Fermi bubbles or from black hole material in the center of the galaxy. In the new work, researchers have studied HVCS FB more closely to learn more about their composition.

The main objective of researchers was to determine the ratio of metals in clouds; if these indicators were consistent with other materials in the vicinity, this confirmed the theory of localized origin of HVCS FB.

However, in analysing both new and archival data from several telescopes, researchers found that in many cases there were no matches, which means that at least part of the material in the clouds had to come from more remote locations, perhaps even from the halo, a cloud of gases that surrounds the galaxy.

The Fermi bubbles, which span 25,000 light-years each, are on both sides of the galaxy and emit X-rays and gamma rays, which could have been caused by relativist jets from a supermassive black hole that was active 5-6 million years ago.