Asteroid impacts produce unusual diamonds

Asteroid impacts produce unusual diamonds

A team of researchers found that diamonds formed some 50,000 years ago during a high energy shock from an asteroid impact were unique and exceptional in that they were formed with short-term exposure to high temperatures and extreme pressure.

Researchers say that these structures can be used in state-of-the-art technologies to create super-strength and subservient materials whose properties can be changed.

To prove it, the team used modern crystallographic and spectroscopic studies of the Lonsdale mineral, part of the iron meteorite of Canyon Diablo, first discovered in the Arizona desert in 1891.

It turns out that the mineral consists of nano-structured diamond-like and grapho-like plants, where the two minerals in the crystal grow together, and the team also found faults in the sequences of repeated layers of atoms.